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Evidence for Various Research-based Instructional Strategies: Countering Critiques

There are several bloggers continuing to criticize constructivist-inspired teaching methods.  They almost always base their criticisms on a 2006 opinion piece by Kirshner, Sweller (inventor of Cognitive Load Theory), and Clark entitled “Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Does Not Work: An

Posted in education, learning sciences, research

In Defense of Hand Washing: Lessons from Healthcare for College Teaching

(the title’s a play on the recent huge spate of articles “in defense of lecturing”) Healthcare in the 19th Century Imagine going to a hospital where few if any of the doctors have any professional training (they are essentially amateurs).

Posted in education, learning sciences, teaching

Horace’s Compromise and the Faculty-Student Non-Aggression Pact

Concerning the 1984 book Horace’s Compromise by Ted Sizer: “In it, he examined the fundamental compromise at the heart of allegedly successful American high schools. He suggested that the students agree to generally behave in exchange for the schools agreeing

Posted in education, teaching, theory

Fixing Calculus Courses

After doing midterm semester surveys and observations in several calculus courses, I compiled a list of suggested resources and strategies for improving student performance in calculus.  I also posted this to the POD list along with a little more background on

Posted in education, research, software, teaching, technology

200+ Educational Google+ Communities

In January I compiled a list of education related Google+ communities in this Google document.  I then added another 30 communities in May, bringing the list to over 80 Google+ communities now, which is copied below and ordered by their

Posted in community, edtech, education, embodiment, learning sciences, teaching, technology

Two Courses That Made a Difference in Student Retention

Universities and colleges have a huge problem with retaining and graduating their students – particularly students in STEM areas (science, technology, engineering, math, where 60% drop out or transfer) and students at community colleges (55% never graduate).  But state colleges

Posted in education, learning sciences, research, teaching

Considering MOOCs: Pros, Cons, Questions

Here are slides for a talk I’m giving to my university about issues to consider before offering MOOCs or accepting MOOCs for credit. Considering MOOCs: Pros, Cons, Questions from Doug Holton I also participated in a webinar about MOOCs for

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Posted in edtech, education, moocs, opensource, teaching, technology, Uncategorized

Doug Holton

Associate Director, Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence, Embry-Riddle

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